Soybean Oil Health Benefits and Side Effects

Written by: Christopher Karam | ✔️ Medically Reviewed by: Dr. Riad M., M.D - G.P and Micheal B., M.D | Last Updated: 2020 June 04

What Is Soybean Oil?

Soybeans or soya bean (Glycine max) is a species of legume that’s native to East Asia. Soya beans are part of the dicotyledonous plants, the family of magnolias and roses, which belongs to the family of Fabaceae (Leguminosae), the family of legumes, peas, and beans.

Soybean oil is a vegetable oil extracted from soybeans and soybean seeds. Soybean oil has recently become a common household cooking oil among the various nuts and vegetable oils. Soybean oil is versatile, low-priced, and somewhat healthy.

There are many health benefits and side effects of soybean oil which have been thoroughly researched and studied. The soybean crop is among the oldest cultivated crops initially in the Chinese islands.

soya beans and soybean oil on a table

Soybeans were introduced to the United States in the 1800s for hay, while it was commercially used for oil and foods in the early 1900s. Soy was widely used in cooking worldwide only during the past 100 years.

The Production of Soybean Oil

According to the USDA’s nutrient database, soybean oil is the second most popular and used cooking oil on the planet. Here’s the list of the most consumed vegetable oils worldwide (updated 2020):

This is because soya bean oil is the most consumed cooking oil in China, at around 45% of all households using primarily soybean oil, 24% uses canola oil (rapeseed oil), 17% palm oil, and 9% using peanut oil.

Soybean oil is produced by cracking open soybean seeds, heating them, and then extracting the oil through physical or chemical processes, set out by the manufacturer.

Most soybean and vegetable oils are extracted by an expeller press, which uses high heat and pressure. Just a few types of cooking oils are cold-pressed, such as olive oil.

Soybean oils, both liquid and partially hydrogenated are sold as a “vegetable oil”, these liquid oils are used for frying while hydrogenated oils (shortening and margarine) are used in cooking and baking.

All of these variations are highly processed and are very bad for your health, hydrogenated fats like the ones found in shortening, are highly toxic.

These products have been through multiple chemical washes and high heats, making the fats highly processed, shelf-stable, toxic, and rancid. Most of the remaining residue from production is called soybean meal, which is used in animal feeds.

Today, soybean is one of the most cultivated crops grown in the U.S, Brazil, Argentina, China, and India, where 98 million metric tons of soybeans are grown in the United States alone, the second largest producer in the world behind China.

Soybean and vegetable oil are among the most affordable vegetable-based oils that are supported by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

How To Use Soybean Oil

Commercially available soybean oil has a clear yellow color, a neutral taste, no scent, and a high smoke point. It can be used with a wide range of cooking styles, recipes, and ingredients.

Soybean oil is high in saturated fat, causing it to have a high smoking point. This allows you to cook with it using light heats to high-temperature frying, soybean oil’s smoke point is 234 °C (453 °F).

Soybean oil can be used in almost any recipe without negatively affecting its flavor, color, aroma or texture because of its light color and neutral flavor, odor, and texture.

Soybeans are also used in commercial paints due to its waxy and thick texture. Soybean oil slowly dries when exposed to air, forming a flexible, transparent, and waterproof solid.

Due to this waxy property, soybeans are used in certain printing inks and oil-based paint products. Soybeans have many uses, however, one issue with soybean oil is its short shelf life.

Soybean oil does not last very long in storage if it’s not processed or hydrogenated. For this reason, it goes under an industrial process known as "hydrogenation".

This process helps the oil be more stable and extends its shelf life. Hydrogenation creates most of the side effects of soybean oil, creating free radicals, harmful trans fats, and multiple toxic chemicals.

Soybean Oil Health Benefits

Soybean oil has been regarded as one of the healthiest cooking oils by healthcare professionals and dietitians because of its plant sterols, which lowers levels of saturated fat and cholesterol.

Multiple research studies claim that it’s healthier than most other vegetable oils due to its good variety of essential fatty acids. The various proven health benefits of soybean oil are why it recently became such a popular cooking oil.

Soybean oil has many healthy fats that contributes to increasing your health and wellbeing, this includes linoleic, saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, and high oleic fatty acid compounds. These reduce your risk of heart disease and obesity.

bowl of tofu and soybeans

1. Soybean Oil Is Full of Antioxidants

Soybean oil is full of antioxidants like vitamin E and vitamin K. Vitamin E and K helps to improve bone health by promoting osteoblastic bone production, bone formation, and bone strengthening.

Getting your recommended daily allowance (RDA) of both vitamin E and vitamin K also helps to limit neuronal damage in the brain. 100 grams of soybean oil gives you 54% of your RDA for vitamin E and 155% of vitamin K.

Soybeans as well as soybean oil help maintain a strong immune system due to the antioxidants and high amounts of vegetable protein found in soybeans, this also helps increase cell regeneration.

2. Full of Healthy Fats and Lecithin

Soybean oil helps to strengthen body tissues and organs since it contains lecithin. Lecithin helps increase the rate of absorption of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, K which helps maximize the nutritional value of your meals.

Lecithin is an essential fat found in animal and plant cells and is used in medicine as well as commercial foods for emulsifying, homogenizing, and smoothing food textures.

Many foods are rich in lecithin, such as:

  • Eggs

  • Soya beans

  • Seafood

  • Brussel sprouts

  • Broccoli

  • Legumes and beans

  • Red meat

  • Organ meat

  • Sunflower oil and sunflower seeds

  • Cottonseed oil

  • Corn oil

Soybean lecithin has been studied and scientifically proven to help maintain brain function and preserve brain health from ageing. Helping increase brain nerve activity, as well as helps prevent schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease.

The health benefits of lecithin are:

  • Increases the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids in breastmilk

  • Fights symptoms of dementia and

  • Improves digestion

  • Softens and moisturizes skin

  • Reduces blood pressure

  • Improves heart and brain health

3. Improves Heart Health

Soybean is full of nutrients, antioxidants, and bioflavonoids that keep your heart healthy. These compounds help reduce the risk of:

  • Cardiovascular disease (CVD)

  • Coronary heart disease (CHD)

  • Oxidative stress-induced heart complications

A study has shown that plant sterols, flavonoids, and bioflavonoids are able to reduce the amount of free radicals, risk of diabetes, and inflammation, while improving HDL cholesterol levels as well as oxidative stress.

Flavonoids are essential for heart health because they reduce inflammation throughout the body and cardiovascular system.

They dilate blood vessels to allow for more oxygen, immune system responses, and nutrients to flow through the body. This helps remove any artery-clogging fats and cholesterol to be broken down and filtered out.

Linolenic acid, a fatty acid used for preventing the hardening of the blood vessels" (atherosclerosis) is also a major fac. All of these health benefits and healthy fats are also necessary for improving eye health.

This makes soybean oil beneficial for older individuals who are more susceptible to eye conditions such as glaucoma, cataract, and the decrease of retina’s function. Most heart-related improvements also beneficially affect vision and eye health.

Soybean oil also helps in preventing diseases and heart conditions like anemia, thalassemia, and arrhythmia.

Studies have found that regular consumption of soybean oil helps to prevent diseases and heart conditions such as anemia, which are primarily caused by a lack of iron in the body.

Soybean oil is also full of phytosterols that have been proven to increases blood flow and reduce bad (LDL) cholesterol. Increasing blood flow improves physical health and performance.

Atherosclerosis is a disease that causes plaque to build in within your arteries, reducing the amount of oxygen-rich blood reaching your organs, brain, heart, and digestive system.

Soybean oil has healthy amino acids that reduce the risk of atherosclerosis and coronary artery diseases, such as:

  • Lysine

  • Cysteine

  • Arginine

  • Methionine

  • Tryptophan

  • Amide

  • Carboxylic acid

  • Acetic acid

  • Thiols

Soybean oil also contains phenols, polyphenols, and phytosterols which contribute to healthy blood pressure levels. Polyphenols and phytosterols regulate blood pressure and reduce the risk of strokes.

The health benefits of phytosterols are:

  • Reduces cholesterol levels

  • Lowers risk of coronary heart disease

  • Has anti-inflammatory properties

  • Reduces apoptosis in cancer cells

  • Increases immune system strength

  • Preserves and improves eye health

  • Reduces symptoms of anemia

4. Supports Tooth and Bone Health

Multiple studies have shown how soybeans helped strengthen bones, teeth, as well as preserve tooth enamel and periodontal ligaments.

Periodontal ligaments are specialized connective tissue fibers that attach the tooth to the alveolar bone, the section of bone that contains tooth sockets (dental alveoli).

A study conducted using virgin olive oil, soybean oil, and Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) found that enamel, gum, and periodontal ligament health were all improved by using soybean and vegetable-based oils.

This protects the teeth from cavities, dental avulsion, gum disease, gingivitis, periodontitis, and periodontal disease.

A research paper found that avocado and soybean oils have also helped improve bone health, as well as prevent osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. The unsaponifiable found in both avocado oil and soybean oil helps with:

  • Inhibiting the development of osteoarthritis

  • Prevents cartilage degradation and production of catabolic enzymes

  • Stimulates collagen production

  • Reduces inflammation and swelling

  • Increases blood flow

  • Improves joint function

  • Reduces pain

During menopause, women experience a loss of bone density due to the lack of production of estrogen, the female hormone. Although your bone density goes down, your risk of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis remains low until old-age.

A study found that consuming soybean oil daily increases estrogen and isoflavone levels in the blood.

This benefits women going through menopause as it supplies estrogen and phytoestrogen to your bones and blood. Increased estrogen and phytoestrogen strengthen weak bones.

soybeans soy milk and edamame

5. May Prevent Cancer and Other Disorders

Certain types of soybean oils are enriched with stearidonic acid (SDA), stearidonic acid is a precursor for EPA. This makes stearidonic enriched soybean oil a much safer and sustainable source of omega-3s as compared to fish.

Diets high in omega-3 fatty acids have an essential role in improved heart health, brain function, immune system function and strength, as well as fetal development.

Omega-3 fatty acids and prevents multiple diseases such as:

  • Inflammation

  • Heart-related diseases

  • Cancer

  • Type 1 and type 2 diabetes

  • Menopause

  • Bone-related diseases

  • Cognitive degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease

Soybean oil helps with the menopausal transition, by reducing some of the side effects of menopause. Increasing skin moisture and strengthening bones. Most ingredients and foods high in phytoestrogen keep bones healthy and maintain skin moisture. Foods that are good for menopause include:

  • Herbal and non-herbal teas such as oolong tea, chamomile tea, green tea, red clover tea, and ginger tea

  • Soy foods such as edamame, soya beans, soy milk, and tofu

  • Beans, legumes, and vegetables such as spinach, garlic, tomatoes, ginseng, sage, cauliflower, broccoli, celery, watercress, carrots, lentils, and avocados

  • Whole grains and fiber-rich foods

  • Foods rich in calcium such as chia seeds, dairy, fatty fish, whey protein, leafy greens, and calcium-fortified foods

  • Foods rich in vitamin D such as sweet potatoes, fatty fish, cheese, egg yolks, organ meats, and vitamin D fortified foods

A study published by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) found a reduced risk of breast cancer and colorectal cancer in people eating soy-based food and products regularly.

Soybean oil is rich in phytoestrogen which helps maintain balanced estrogen levels inside the body, preventing the risk of developing breast and colon cancer.

Lecithin, which is abundantly found in soybean oil keeps your digestive system healthy. Lecithin dissolves body fat and cholesterol, which increases your basal metabolic rate (BMR) and cleanses your liver, gallbladder, and kidneys.

6. Helps Women Regulate Menopausal Cycles

Soya beans are full of phytoestrogen and estrogen, which are highly beneficial to women of all ages. Both forms of estrogen are used to regulate hormones in the body of both men and women, a good balance is optimal for staying healthy.

Multiple studies have proven that consuming soy products and oils regularly showed a regulation in menstrual cycles, hormone production, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and menstrual cycle length.

An additional study found that women who consumed 60 grams of soy protein daily for 1 month showed many health benefits, including:

  • Reduced risk of breast cancer.

  • Reduced blood cholesterol levels.

  • Improved follicular phase (proliferation phase), where follicles in the ovary mature, before ovulation.

  • Increased estrogen

  • Lower cortisol, the stress hormone

  • Improved insulin sensitivity

Soybean Oil Side Effects and Detriments

Soybean oil can be very healthy for you, but it does have quite a few harmful side effects. Multiple studies have found that soybean oil can contribute to obesity, being more obesogenic than fructose in certain cases.

1. Soybean Oil Leads to Obesity and Diabetes

A study published by the University of California’s Research Center (UCRC) showed that soybean oil can contribute to obesity and diabetes.

The research was conducted using mice that have been fed 3 diets, high oleic soybean oil, soybean oil with low oleic acid, and coconut oil. After 16 weeks, the group of mice that have been fed soybean oil daily found an increased risk of:

  • Obesity

  • Type 1 and type 2 diabetes

  • Increased insulin resistance

  • Fatty liver disease (FLD)

  • Inflammation

The study also concluded that soybean oil had aggressive and harmful side effects on the hypothalamus, reducing levels of oxytocin, better known as the “love hormone”.

Additional research papers concluded that diets high in soybean oil negatively affects metabolic health, including blood glucose, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, and insulin, reducing your metabolism.

2. Promotes Inflammatory Diseases

Soybean oil is a pro-inflammatory food, chronic inflammation plays a role in several age-related, neurological, and cognitive degenerative diseases.

Causing inflammation promotes illnesses and diseases throughout the body, especially in the brain and cardiovascular system. Soybean causes inflammation due to its high amounts of omega-6 fatty acids.

These diseases propagate, cause, and aggravate existing or new issues, such as arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and cognitive degenerative diseases such as:

  • Autism

  • Alzheimer’s disease

  • Parkinson's disease

  • Anxiety

  • Depression

  • Asthma

A study compared cow ghee (clarified butter oil) with soybean oil in the diets of rats. After 48 weeks the rats in both groups have 10x their body weights, from 25 grams to around 250 grams.

Additionally, their livers weren’t removing toxins from their bloodstreams efficiently and found carcinogenic activity in the liver. While ghee had no impact on cancer risk factors.

If you cooking with soybean oil and introduce it to high heats, the chemical composition of the oil will create free radicals, aldehydes, and trans fats.

This removes any potential health benefits and will oxidize your oil, making it toxic to your liver and amplifying any existing side effects.

spoon of soybeans

3. Aggravates and Causes Eczema

Soybean oil may increase the chances of developing eczema or asthma and can aggravate existing skin conditions as well as allergic reaction symptoms.

Multiple research papers and studies were conducted on pregnant women consuming soybean oil and omega-6 fatty acids. 91 atopic mothers suffering from existing allergies were given a diet high in omega-6s and low in omega-3s.

The study spanned over 6 months of breastfeeding their children while on a high omega-6 diet. After 6 months, they found that the mothers with a history of asthma, hayfever, or eczema had an increased risk of having their child develop non-atopic eczema.

This was caused by increased levels of omega-6 fatty acids in breast milk, which had many side effects on the infant's health.

The researchers also discovered that children who were exposed to more omega-6 fatty acids in their diets were more likely to develop non-atopic eczema.

A study conducted at the De­part­ment of Der­ma­to­logy, Al­ler­go­logy and Ve­nere­ology in the Czech Republic examines 175 patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. They were given soybean oil orally and applied the oil to the skin.

The soybean oil triggered numerous allergic reactions with a moderate severity in people who have allergies to peanuts or pollen, and people with existing eczema and asthma. Soy triggered allergic reactions and aggravated symptoms such as:

  • Asthma

  • Eczema

  • Hives

  • Nasal congestion and a runny nose

  • Atopic dermatitis

Applying coconut oil to your skin can reduce the severity of skin disorders and infections.

4. May Cause Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the 3rd most diagnosed form of cancer worldwide, both colon cancer and rectal cancer are tied to poor diets, eating habits, and a lack of exercise.

Multiple studies have determined that soybean oil and other harmful vegetable oils including canola oil, have damaging effects on the digestive system, increasing the risk of colorectal cancer. These damaging side effects include:

  • Facilitates the secretion of bile acids.

  • Damages the mucus layer of the stomach and intestinal linings.

  • Creates epithelial hyperplasia, a precursor for cancer cells.

A case study performed at the Bellvitge Colorectal Cancer Study (BCC) had 424 patients with existing colorectal cancer symptoms and found that when given a diet high in soy-based foods and oils, the risk and severity of cancer grew by 4%.

5. May Reduce Sperm Count in Men

Soybean oil has many side effects on male fertility, as excess estrogen can promote low sperm count and damage to the male reproductive system.

A medical article published on soya bean and extra virgin olive oil consumption in male rats found many harmful side effects. After being fed genetically modified soya bean (GMSB) for 65 days, the rats suffered from the following side effects:

  • Reduced weight of the testicles

  • Epididymis (the duct behind the testicles)

  • Prostate

  • Seminal vesicles (the tubular glands connecting to the urinary bladder)

  • Sperm count, motility, abnormalities, and health

  • Levels of vitamin E

  • Zinc

  • Testosterone

The group was then fed with extra virgin olive oil for an additional 65 days. After the trial, the rats suffered no side effects and restored the majority of the damages caused by the soya beans.

This highly suggests that males should avoid consuming soybean oil as well as soy-based products.

Rating and Recommendation

Slightly Recommended

Soybean oil is a controversial ingredient with many health benefits and side effects. Most of the health benefits stem from the healthy omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants, and high amounts of lecithin.

The prominent issues with soybean oil are that it’s heavily hydrogenated, full of trans fats, and full of estrogen.

The trans fats aren’t listed in the nutrition facts because, in the production process, high heats are used to oxidize the oil, creating free radicals and trans fats. Additionally, soybean oil is a major component of margarine and shortening.

Both margarine and shortening are fully hydrogenated oils, which have had their medium and long-chain fatty acids are broken down, turning the product solid and loaded with free radicals as well as trans fats.

Here’s the full list of the health benefits of soybean oil:

  1. Soybean Oil Is Full of Antioxidants

  2. Full of Healthy Fats and Lecithin

  3. Improves Heart Health

  4. Supports Tooth and Bone Health

  5. May Prevent Cancer and Other Disorders

  6. Helps Women Regulate Menopausal Cycles

Here’s the list of side effects of soybean oil:

  1. Soybean Oil Leads to Obesity and Diabetes

  2. Promotes Inflammatory Diseases

  3. Aggravates and Causes Eczema

  4. May Cause Colorectal Cancer

  5. May Reduce Sperm Count in Men

soya beans

Soybean oil’s health benefits come from its omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, the high amount of omega-6s cause many harmful side effects.

Because the North American diet is full of omega-6 fats, it’s very to eat too many. This may cause inflammation, diarrhea, a higher risk of stroke, insomnia, and low blood pressure.

Additionally, the production method of soybean oil causes a lot of trans fats to form as well as hydrogenates the healthy fats and oils, turning them toxic, rancid, and harmful.

Soybean oil is not recommended for the majority of people, here are cooking oils that are recommended for everyday use:

  • Olive oil

  • Coconut oil

  • Avocado oil

  • Sesame oil

  • Fish oil

The estrogen content may be beneficial to certain women. If you have existing illnesses and at risk of cardiovascular diseases then you should avoid soybean oil.

Women who are in good health can benefit from consuming soy-based products, as they may help regulate your menstrual phase and increase fertility.

This is the opposite in men, where excess estrogen may decrease fertility cause adverse side effects such as impotence and erectile dysfunction.

Frequently Asked Questions

Soybeans or soya bean (Glycine max) is a species of legume that’s native to East Asia. Soya beans are part of the dicotyledonous plants, the family of magnolias and roses, which belongs to the family of Fabaceae (Leguminosae), the family of legumes, peas, and beans.

Soybean oil is a vegetable oil extracted from soybeans and soybean seeds. Soybean oil has recently become a common household cooking oil among the various nuts and vegetable oils. Soybean oil is versatile, low-priced, and moderately healthy.

There are many health benefits and side effects of soybean oil which have been thoroughly researched and studied. The soybean crop is among the oldest cultivated crops initially in the Chinese islands.

Soybeans were introduced to the United States in the 1800s for hay, while it was commercially used for oil and foods in the early 1900s. Soy was widely used in cooking worldwide only during the past 100 years.

Soybean oil is produced by cracking open soybean seeds, heating them, and then extracting the oil through physical or chemical processes, set out by the manufacturer.

Most soybean and vegetable oils are extracted by an expeller press, which uses high heat and pressure. Just a few types of cooking oils are cold-pressed, such as olive oil.

Soybean oils, both liquid and partially hydrogenated are sold as a “vegetable oil”, these liquid oils are used for frying while hydrogenated oils (shortening and margarine) are used in cooking and baking.

All of these variations are highly processed and are very bad for your health, hydrogenated fats like the ones found in shortening, are highly toxic.

These products have been through multiple chemical washes and high heats, making the fats highly processed, shelf-stable, toxic, and rancid. Most of the remaining residue from production is called soybean meal, which is used in animal feeds.

Soybean oil has been regarded as one of the healthiest cooking oils by healthcare professionals and dietitians because of its low levels of saturated fat and has no cholesterol.

Multiple research studies claim that it’s healthier than most other vegetable oils due to its good variety of essential fatty acids. The various proven health benefits of soybean oil are partially why it has recently become such a popular cooking oil.

Soybean oil is full of antioxidants like vitamin E and vitamin K. Vitamin E and K helps to improve bone health by promoting osteoblastic bone production, bone formation, and bone strengthening.

Soybeans and their oils help maintain a strong immune system due to the antioxidants and high amounts of vegetable protein found in soybeans, this also helps increase cell regeneration.

1. Soybean Oil Is Full of Antioxidants

2. Full of Healthy Fats and Lecithin

3. Improves Heart Health

4. Supports Tooth and Bone Health

5. May Prevent Cancer and Other Disorders

6. Helps Women Regulate Menopausal Cycles

Soybean oil can be very healthy for you, but it does have quite a few harmful side effects. Multiple studies have found that soybean oil can contribute to obesity, being more obesogenic than fructose in certain cases.

A study published by the University of California’s Research Center (UCRC) showed that soybean oil can contribute to obesity and diabetes.

Soybean oil is a pro-inflammatory food, chronic inflammation plays a role in several age-related, neurological, and cognitive degenerative diseases.

Causing inflammation promotes illnesses and diseases throughout the body, especially in the brain and cardiovascular system. Soybean causes inflammation due to its high amounts of omega-6 fatty acids.

1. Soybean Oil Leads to Obesity and Diabetes

2. Promotes Inflammatory Diseases

3. Aggravates and Causes Eczema

4. May Cause Colorectal Cancer

5. May Reduce Sperm Count in Men

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Making soy milk is fairly simple and easy, even for the average home cook.

When making soy milk, here are some basic kitchenware items you'll need, such as a large saucepan or cooking pot, blender or hand mixer, a large cheesecloth covering a bowl, and at least 100 grams of soybeans.

1. To make soy milk, make sure that you leave your soybeans soaking in cold water for 5 to 6 hours.

2. Add your soybeans into your blender, adding water onto the soybeans. 2 parts soybeans to 1 part water.

3. Blend the mix until it's smooth. Pouring the mix into the cheesecloth and squeeze the mix to release the soy milk.

4. Pour the untreated soy milk into a saucepan or pot. Stir constantly under a medium-low heat (285°F or 140°C) until the milk starts to boil. When it starts to boil leave the pot covered over low heat (270°F or 132°C) for 15 minutes to thicken.

5. Store and enjoy your soy milk!

Articles and Sources

1. Food Nutr Res. (2015 September 18) Ameliorating effect of olive oil on fertility of male rats fed on genetically modified soya bean

2. Nutrients. (2016 December 12) Soy and Health Update: Evaluation of the Clinical and Epidemiologic Literature

3. Food Sci Biotechnol. (2018 October 05) Effect of the pH on the lipid oxidation and polyphenols of soybean oil-in-water emulsion with added peppermint (Mentha piperita) extract in the presence and absence of iron

4. Food Chem. (2017 April 15) Antioxidant activity of amino acids in soybean oil at frying temperature: Structural effects and synergism with tocopherols.

5. Pediatr Dent. (2019 November 06) Virgin Olive Oil, Soybean Oil, and Hank's Balanced Salt Solution Used as Storage Media on Periodontal Ligament Cell Viability.

6. Cartilage. (2015 January 01) Management of Osteoarthritis with Avocado/Soybean Unsaponifiables

7. Eur J Nutr. (2015 September 06) Benefits of foods supplemented with vegetable oils rich in α-linolenic, stearidonic or docosahexaenoic acid in hypertriglyceridemic subjects: a double-blind, randomized, controlled trail.

8. J Nutr. (2012 March 03) The omega-3 fatty acid nutritional landscape: health benefits and sources.

9. Am J Clin Nutr. (2010 October 04) Dietary intake of stearidonic acid-enriched soybean oil increases the omega-3 index: randomized, double-blind clinical study of efficacy and safety.

10. J Nutr. (2009 January 01) Dietary stearidonic acid is a long chain (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid with potential health benefits.

11. Poonamjot Deol, Elena Kozlova, Matthew Valdez (2020 January 08) Dysregulation of Hypothalamic Gene Expression and the Oxytocinergic System by Soybean Oil Diets in Male Mice

12. Biomed Environ Sci. (2000 June 02) Effect of dietary fatty acids on colon tumorigenesis induced by methyl nitrosourea in rats.

13. Indian J Med Res. (2012 September 03) Effects of cow ghee (clarified butter oil) & soybean oil on carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes in rats

14. Nutr Cancer. (1991 January 15) A fish oil diet inhibits colon cancer in mice.

15. Sci Rep. (2016 May 12) Soy isoflavone consumption and colorectal cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis

16. Cancer Causes Control. (2013 March 03) Association between habitual dietary flavonoid and lignan intake and colorectal cancer in a Spanish case-control study (the Bellvitge Colorectal Cancer Study).

17. Int J Mol Sci. (2018 January 01) Anti-Inflammatory and Skin Barrier Repair Effects of Topical Application of Some Plant Oils

18. Indian J Dermatol. (2013 July 04) Soy Allergy in Patients Suffering from Atopic Dermatitis

19. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. (2006 February 01) Atopy, eczema and breast milk fatty acids in a high-risk cohort of children followed from birth to 5 yr.

20. BMC Public Health. (2011 May 21) Polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and prevalence of eczema and rhinoconjunctivitis in Japanese children: The Ryukyus Child Health Study

21. Br J Cancer. (2000 June 11) Effects of soy foods on ovarian function in premenopausal women

22. Am J Clin Nutr. (1994 September 03) Biological effects of a diet of soy protein rich in isoflavones on the menstrual cycle of premenopausal women.

23. Br J Nutr. (1995 October 04) Biological effects of isoflavones in young women: importance of the chemical composition of soyabean products.

24. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. (1999 January) Soy isoflavones exert modest hormonal effects in premenopausal women.

soybean oil and soybeans on a wooden table

Soybean Oil Nutrition Facts

Serving Size 100 g (about 3.5 Oz or 0.44 Cups)

Amount Per Serving
Calories 884 Calories from Fat 884
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 100 g 153 %
Saturated Fat 16 g 80 %
Polyunsaturated fat 58 g
Monounsaturated fat 23 g
Trans Fat 0.5 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0 %
Sodium 0 mg 0 %
Potassium 0 g 0 %
Total Carbohydrate 0 g 0 %
Dietary Fiber 0 g 0 %
Sugars 0 g
Protein 0 g 0 %
Vitamin A 0 % Vitamin C 0 %
Vitamin E 54 % Vitamin K 153 %
Vitamin D 0 % Vitamin B6 0 %
Calcium 0 % Iron 0 %
Magnesium 0 % Cobalamin 0 %

Calories per gram:

Fat: 9 | Carbohydrate: 4 | Protein: 4

Source: USDA's Nutrient Database

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